Utterance Rock


Another piece of this work-in-progress. I think the artwork is done, but the story behind it is coming more slowly. So far, I have only two sentences: “Thirty miles northwest of a small village named Pisinemo (or Pisin Mo’o) is an inscribed stone, overgrown in a copse of ironwood, cholla and whitethorn acacia. The inscription refers to a very popular poem in the rustic dialect, about the heroine Roya Teymu, who recoverd the use of her mutilated limbs at this sacred site.” That info is from an old pamphlet, “A Brief History of Utterance Rock’, Oracle Junction Press, 1956, 16 pages (which I found tucked in one of my imaginary books).

A Grotrolem Decomposition of an Anise Seed


Named after Georgy Gustav Grotrolem, geometrist, born 1790, died sometime after 1868. On January 28, 1898, a body identified as Grotrolem’s was found in the attic of a house on Rue Espariat in Aix-en-Provence. His major work was published in Gesammelte Werke im Volumenschattengraphik, 1863.

Today’s GLP panel is one of the many misprints from Newark’s Star-Ledger preferred by Yost over the error-free reproductions. He liked this one so well that he apparently destroyed his original artwork, and we only have this image in the collection of GLP slides gifted to us by Yost’s assistant, Ha Kim Ngoc.

© 2018 lcmt

Bagri Maro and the Matacaballos


Bagri Maro is the hero of Tales of a Horse Scorpion, a series of novels by Raymond Lully. The setting of the novels is a future Earth where humans have become extinct and the world is dominated by five races of intelligent arthropods. Wm. Yost said he encountered the work of Raymond Lully in his early teens, when he saw the novels in a comic book, in a depiction of Dr. Strange’s library by Steve Ditko.

Ancient Quincuncial Networks


Jainne Lummrey was a postgraduate student at Newcastle University, studying the history and literature of early modern Britain, when she discovered Geranium Lake Properties in the British comic magazine Viz. (GLP appeared irregularly in Viz from 1987 to 1991, according to a deal with John Brown that was independent from Yost’s agreements with his other comics syndication services.) Jainne wrote to Yost after the “Ancient Quincuncial Networks” panel was published in May 1990. Thus began an ardent correspondence that lasted for nine years, until Jainne Lummrey’s death in 1999. Yost last letter arrived at Jainne’s London address two days after the police discovered her body. The letter was sent from New Zealand, postmarked the day before Yost disappeared after boarding a ferry from Auckland to Rangitoto Island.


Cover for the first edition of Urn Burial, The Garden of Cyrus by Thomas Browne: A New Interpretation by Jainne Lummrey, 1997, Trace Mark Press.

© 2018 lcmt

Ossva is for Ossvanian ivory…



“Ossva is for Ossvanian ivory, which comes from the buttons shed every winter by Ossvaniyra. The buttons are gathered by children in early spring after the snow melts, a tradition comparable to an Easter egg hunt. Ossvaniyra are semifossorial, and their burrows are sometimes spoiled by the unchecked enthusiasm of immature humans. A few of the more unruly children may disappear during the button gathering. Ossvaniyra are not over-large but they are omnivorous, and a small brat can make a tasty treat. The buttons are carved by tinsmiths into traditional shapes like cabbages, beetles and rabbits.”

Top image: Decorative captial letter Ossva, shaped as an Ossvaniyr.
Bottom image: My usual lousy photograph of the cheap paperback edition from the seventies. You can see the 1926 first edition cover here.

He and his brother watched clouds of lizard energy cluster and accelerate

Below is another offering from my library of imaginary books, this image comes from An Ornate Asemic Alphabet in Monstrose Forms, by Davida Elzevir-Dewey and Joanna Vandy, George H. Doran Company, 1926

…and a gif, mostly asemic, titled “Southern Cross”, and somehow connected to the song by Crosby, Stills and Nash.


© 2017 lcmt

The Semi-Annual Gala Luncheon of Cognizance


Above is the incomplete cover design for The Semi-Annual Gala Luncheon of Cognizance.

Wm. Yost made four variations of his attempt to interpret Hamlet within the GLP cosmology, as part of his series of Shakepeare plays translated for horned lizards. Two of the Hamlet panels were supposed to be published for the first time in a book, The Semi-Annual Gala Luncheon of Cognizance, scheduled for release in late November 1998. More than half the book was to be a Geranium Lake Properties retrospective, but the publisher planned at least forty pages devoted to new material, in a lavish hard-cover format. A further announcement changed the release date to early December, then it was pushed back to a week before Christmas, then it became little more than a hope for early 1999. Yost disappeared in 1999–the last reported sighting was of Yost boarding a ferry on a trip out from Auckland, New Zealand, on April 1rst. The book was never published.

This is a gif I made out of Yost’s variations:

The Tale of the Rust-Stained Jug


Six Tales from the Glorious Assemblage of Haberdashers is an imaginary book by Abby Ashier Chertsey. It was a once-cherished but mostly forgotten childhood classic for Wm. Yost, imaginary author of Geranium Lake Properties. Yost accidentally encountered Chertsey in 1995, in her garden on Bryher island, when he was on a tour of small British islands. Yost had stopped to admire a hillside of daffodils, and subsequently was rescued by the 103-year-old Chertsey from the affections of her mixed-breed wolfhound, a very large and exuberant puppy named Penarddun, called Penny, or Bad Penny.

Luristan bronze

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© 2016 Lin Tarczynski

Today’s comic steals from a book on the shelf above my computer monitor, jammed between Shocking Beauty by Thomas Hobbs and Where the Buffaloes Begin by Olaf Baker, illustrated by Stephen Gammell. Neither of those books is imaginary. Forty-Four Insanely Fun DIY Craft Projects from Luristan Bronzes, From the Dang Simple to the Kinda Hard, written by Amy Lou Biehl and illustrated by Celestina Zeballos, comes out of my library of imaginary books. It was published in 1973 by Ten Speed Press in Berkley, California. Soft cover, with 160 pages.

Yost’s copy is signed by Celestina Zeballos with the inscription “For Wm. Thanks for the absurd pedigree full of rain. Celestina Z.”

Asemic comics are published here three times a week, on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Finding significance in the failure of words

glp523
© 2016 Lin Tarczynski

Today’s GLP comic is all me. After I posted Tuesday’s panel, I received encouragement from both GLP historian Michael Veerduer, and Yost’s former assistant, Ha Kim Ngoc, to occasionally publish as myself under the Geranium Lake Properties title. I think it is a perfectly normal thing to get advice from fictional people. As soon as I learned to read, I started absorbing all sorts of life lessons from mythical beings, from Bartholomew Cubbins to Cinderella to Spider-Man to Dear Abby to Jesus. For my understanding of Wm. Yost, I have relied heavily on the novel The Boy in the Yellow Leatherette Portmanteau by Gralie Bohe, a fictional piece of fiction by a fictional author. (The novel is set in the fictional town of Whittlespear Beach, California. California is not fictional, it just seems that way.)

Geranium Lake Properties, aka skira athuraz

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© lcmt 2014

An early Fulcanello map of an unnamed hypergraphic object, using Alaincime ley projections. In her novel, The Boy in the Yellow Leatherette Portmanteau (a fictional account of what happened to Wm. Yost after he disappeared in the late nineties) Gralie Bohe included this, and last Sunday’s panel, in a group of GLP cartoons labeled “Traveling Papers”.

Asemic comics are published here three times a week, on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday.